Industry and Community Engagement for Work-Integrated Learning

(First offered in 2017)

Provides practitioners with the opportunity to further their understanding of the importance of industry and community engagement for WIL and of strategies to enhance this engagement.  Challenges and opportunities for industry and community engagement are considered.

Module description

This module provides practitioners the opportunity to further their understanding the fundamental importance of industry/community engagement for WIL and to improve strategies to enhance this engagement. This module will cover the full spectrum of the relationship with industry/community members: prospecting, recruiting and retaining them, supporting them as educators, and finally, building on these relationships for more strategic purposes. This module will provide an opportunity to gain a global perspective on this topic.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the module, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe industry/community engagement and identify key components as it relates to work integrated learning
  2. Understand a global perspective of industry/community engagement for WIL identifying and describing diverse practices and strategies.
  3. Identify one industry/community engagement challenge in a program and be able to develop and present a strategy for improvement including a plan for measuring impact.

Readings:

Activities for weeks 1-6: Read suggested reading, complete suggested reflection by posting through the chat section of the website, respond to the reflections of others

Week 1.

For an overview of the benefits of WIL to a variety of employers: Reflect on this reading and consider how to frame these benefits when prospecting, recruiting and retaining industry/community:

Sattler, P. (2011). Work-Integrated Learning in Ontario’s Postsecondary Sector. Toronto: Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. http://www.heqco.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/WIL1E.pdf pp.67 -73

Or

Braunstein, L., Takei, H., Wang, F., & Loken, M. (2011) Benefits of cooperative and work-integrated education for employers. in R.K. Coll and K.E. Zegwaard (Eds.) International Handbook for Co-operative and Work-Integrated Education. 2nd ed., World Association for Cooperative Education, Inc., pp. 277-286.

Week 2.

For an overview of the success factors involved in sustaining work integrated learning relationships with industry / community Reflect on this reading and consider key factors for sustaining relationships

Fleming, J. McLachlan,K. Pretti,TJ ( 2018 ),Successful work-integrated learning relationships: A framework for sustainability International Journal of Work-Integrated Learning, 2018, 19(4), 321-335 322

Week 3

For an overview of the importance of building effective industry university relationships: Reflect on mechanisms to enable industry university partnerships and the implications for WIL of boundary spanning

Peach, D., Cates, C., Jones, J., Lechleiter, H., & Ilg, B. (2011) Responding to rapid change in higher education: enabling university departments responsible for work related programs through boundary spanning. Journal of Cooperative Education and Internships, 45(1), pp. 94-106. https://wilresearch.uwaterloo.ca/Resource/View/109

Week 4.

For an overview of the importance of setting the stage for proper engagement that considers the supervisor as an “educator” that includes the role of supervisor and the importance of feedback

Fleming, J., Rowe, A.D.,& Jackson, D. (2021) Employers as educators: the role of work placement supervisors in facilitating the transfer of skills and knowledge, Journal of Education and Work, [Advance online] DOI: 10.1080/13639080.2021.1969343

Winchester –Seeto, T.,Rowe,A.,Mackaway J.(2016 )Sharing the load: Understanding the roles of academics and host supervisors in work-integrated learning International Journal of Work-integrated Learning 17(2), 101-118 https://www.ijwil.org/files/APJCE_17_2_101_118.pdf

Peach, D.,Ruinard,E.,Webb,F. ( 2014) Feedback on student performance in the workplace: The role of workplace supervisors Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, Special Issue, 2014, 15(3), 241-252 https://www.ijwil.org/files/APJCE_15_3_241_252.pdf

Week 5-6:

Additional suggested readings, or participants can identify other readings of their choice. The expectation is that at least 2 other articles will be read. The International Journal of Work-integrated Learning (formerly APJCE) https://www.ijwil.org/ is a good source for readings such as:

Some other suggestions:

Jackson,D.,Ferns.,Rowbottom,D., McLaren,D.( 2017) Employer understanding of Work-Integrated Learning and the challenges of engaging in work placement opportunities https://ro.ecu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3922&context=ecuworkspost2013

Kay, J., Russell, L., Winchester-Seeto, T., Rowe, A., & Le Clus, M. (2014). External Stakeholders in WIL. In S. Ferns (Ed.), HERDSA Guide: Work Integrated Learning in the curriculum (pp. 59-63). Milperra, NSW: Higher Education and Development Society of Australasia.

Week 7-8

Prepare for the webinar, attend webinar and participate in the final online discussion with a reflection on learnings from the module and provide feedback on the module.

Tasks/Activities:

During the module there will be an on-line webinar and other forms of communication.

  1. Students will prepare for the webinar at the end of the module by completing readings and a reflection of the industry / community strategies used by WIL programs. (Approx 5 hours)
  2. Students will consider a challenge in industry/community engagement in their WIL program, identify and evaluate possible options and outline a plan for implementation including the required resources. (Approx 5 hours)
  3. Students will participate in three webinars: an introductory webinar, a webinar in week 4 and a webinar where they will present their findings, identify for discussion a challenge in industry/community engagement faced by their WIL program within the perspective identified in Activity Two. (Approx 3 hours)

Participation time:

Expected total participation time approximately 15 – 20 hours – including preparation and participation in online tasks/activities.

Certificate of completion:

On completion of the module, participants will receive a Certificate of Completion. This will be awarded to participants who complete all the required tasks/activities.

Module plan

Wk begAim of activityPreparation by participantsOnline activity by participants
Oct-18Introductions: Getting to know other participants & familiarization.
Aim: to gain an overview of the benefits of WIL to a variety of employers
Become familiar with online site.Read one reading listed in Module DescriptorParticipants and facilitators introduce themselves in the Discussion Forum.
Post a brief reflection on reading that includes consideration on how to frame these benefits when prospecting, recruiting and retaining industry/community (200 words)
Oct-25Learning outcome a)
Aim to gain an overview of the success factors involved in sustaining work integrated learning relationships with industry / community
Read the reading listed in Module DescriptorFirst webinar – Sign in at the allotted time, actively participate in the webinar group and discuss factors from the reading that work well or are considered important in your Institution or programs and factors that require more focus.
Post brief reflection on the reading.
Nov-01Gain an overview of the importance of setting the stage for proper engagement through building effective industry-university partnerships. (Learning outcome a)Read the reading listed in Module DescriptorPost a brief reflection on reading and how you have worked towards building effective industry-university partnerships at your institution or context and the implications for WIL of boundary spanning (300 words) and contribute to online discussion by posting a reflection on at least one post from another participant (100 words)
Nov-08For an overview of the importance the role of the supervisor as an “educator” the importance of supervisor feedback.
(Learning outcome b)
Readings from Module Descriptor or other readings of your choice. (At least 2 articles).Second Webinar: Contribute to webinar discussions on the importance of the role of the supervisor.
Post a brief reflection on this reading that includes how you support supervisors to be educators and to provide effective feedback to students in your institution or context: (300 words) Contribute to online discussions in the discussion forum by posting a reflection on at least one post from another participant (100 words)
Nov-15To gain a broad understanding of challenges and opportunities for industry engagement as discussed in literature.
(Learning outcome b)
Identify other readings of your choice. At least 1 other article to be read.Post a brief reflection on your reading and how it relates to your context: (300 words) and contribute to online discussion in the discussion forum by posting a reflection on at least one post from another participant (100 words)
Nov-22Preparing for the WebinarComplete assigned readings and reflections of industry / community strategies used by WIL programs.Consider a challenge in industry/community engagement in your WIL program, identify and evaluate possible options drawing on the module readings and outline a plan for implementation including impact measures, contingencies and potential risks.
Nov-29Webinar
(Learning outcome a, b and c)
Participate in final webinar to present a challenge, options, implementation plan and plan for measuring impact. Final webinar - Sign in at the allotted time, actively participate in their webinar group and engage in the on-line discussion during the webinar.
Dec-06Module conclusion
(Learning outcome a, b and c)
Participate in a final on-line discussion, reflecting on learnings from the module and provide feedback by completing the final survey to evaluate this module.